Regular dental exams help protect your oral health and general well-being. A dental exam gives us a chance to provide tips on caring for your teeth and to detect any problems early — when they're most treatable.

 

Regular dental exams are an important part of preventive health care. During a dental exam, the dentist will identify gum inflammation or bone loss. The dentist will evaluate your risk of developing tooth decay and other oral health problems, as well as check your face, neck and mouth for abnormalities. A dental exam might also include dental X-rays or other diagnostic procedures.

 

During a dental exam, the dentist or hygienist will likely discuss your diet and oral hygiene habits and might demonstrate proper brushing and flossing techniques. Other topics for discussion during a dental exam might include:

  • Any medications you're taking

  • Use of tobacco products

  • Consequences of tooth loss

  • Benefits of crowns, fixed bridges or dental implants

  • Use of dentures

  • Cosmetic procedures

 

A dental exam also gives you the opportunity to ask questions about oral health.

 

 

 

 

 

A dental hygienist at Zent Family Dentistry performs dental cleanings.  A dental cleaning is also called a prophylaxis, or a prophy for short.  Prophylaxis literally means a preventative treatment of a disease.   Dental cleanings are an important part of good oral hygiene.  The dental cleaning is done to remove plaque, calculus (hard deposits aka tartar), and stain from teeth.  

 

Dental cleanings are intended to prevent cavities, gingivitis, and periodontal disease.  The hygienist will also floss and polish the teeth.  Reviewing efficient brushing and flossing techniques is also a routine part of the dental cleaning at Zent Family Dentistry.  Many times, the hygienist will discuss and provide you with free samples of different hygiene instruments and aids depending on your individual needs.

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know almost 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed with oral and throat cancers this year? And that the 5-year survival rate of those diagnosed is only slightly more than 64 percent? When cancer is detected and treated early, treatment-related health problems are reduced.


The oral cavity includes your lips, cheek lining, gums, front part of your tongue, floor of the mouth beneath the tongue and the hard palate that makes up the roof of your mouth. The throat (pharynx) starts at the soft part of the roof of your mouth and continues back into your throat. It includes the back section of your tongue as well as the base where the tongue attaches to the floor of your mouth.

 

During your dental visit, your dentist can talk to you about your health history and examine all areas of your mouth for signs of mouth and/or throat cancer. The screening will consist of a visual inspection of the mouth and palpation of the jaw and neck. Visual oral cancer screenings are a part of every comprehensive or periodic dental exam.  Regular visits to your dentist can improve the chances that any suspicious changes in your oral health will be caught early, at a time when cancer can be treated more easily. In between visits, it's important to be aware of the following signs and symptoms and to see your dentist if they do not disappear after two weeks.

 

The symptoms of mouth or throat cancer can include:

  • a sore or irritation that doesn't go away

  • red or white patches

  • pain, tenderness or numbness in mouth or lips

  • a lump, thickening, rough spot, crust or small eroded area

  • difficulty chewing, swallowing, speaking or moving your tongue or jaw

  • a change in the way your teeth fit together when you close your mouth

 

Research has identified a number of factors that contribute to the development of mouth and throat cancers. Smokers and excessive alcohol drinkers older than 50 are the most at risk. More recently, the human papilloma virus (HPV), which is sexually transmitted, has been associated with cancers of the oropharyngeal region that is the part of the throat at the back of the mouth. HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers are related to the increasing incidence of throat cancers in non-smoking adults. 

HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers typically develop in the throat at the base of the tongue and near or on the tonsils making them difficult to detect. Although HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers are often diagnosed at a later stage, people with HPV-positive cancers have a lower risk of dying or having recurrence than those with HPV-negative cancers. It is likely that there is a complex interaction of many external and internal factors that play a role in the development of HPV-positive cancers.

 

If you have noticed a suspicious area in your oral cavity, please call your dentist and have the area looked at as soon as possible.  Early detection is the best defense against oral cancer.

 

ViziLite® Oral Cancer Screening

The ViziLite® oral cancer screening is an adjunctive screening system that helps to identify, evaluate, monitor, and mark abnormal oral lesions and is used in combination with traditional visual exams.    Thanks to this amazing new technology, dentists and hygienists can quickly and painlessly screen for oral cancer. 

 

All Adults should have an annual ViziLite® exam because ¼ of oral cancer victims are non-smokers, don’t drink, and have no lifestyle factors to heighten their oral cancer risk. 

 

The screening involves a few simple steps.  First, you rinse thoroughly with a cleaning solution.  This solution dries the cells in your mouth.  Then your dentist or hygienist dims the lights and examines your mouth using the ViziLite® light wand.  If ViziLite® finds a problem area, the spot will become illuminated and “shine” distinctly from the surrounding tissue.  The ViziLite® is a great adjunct to traditional visual oral screenings because the solution and light wand allows us to see more than what we can see on a traditional visual exam.

 

Tissue Biopsy

 If your dentist or hygienist notice a suspicious area in your mouth, a biopsy of the tissue may be prescribed to acquire a diagnosis.  Zent Family Dentistry does some minimally invasive biopsies in our office.  More invasive biopsies are referred to an oral surgeon or periodontist.

 

 

 

 

Digital dental X-rays are a useful diagnostic tool when helping your dentist detect damage and disease not visible during a regular dental exam. How often X-rays should be taken depends on your present oral health, your age, your risk for disease, and any signs and symptoms of oral disease. For example, children may require X-rays more often than adults because their teeth and jaws are still developing and their teeth are more likely to be affected by tooth decay than those of adults. Your dentist will review your history, examine your mouth and then decide whether or not you need X-rays.

 

If you are a new patient, the dentist may recommend X-rays to determine the present status of your oral health and have a baseline to help identify changes that may occur later. A new set of X-rays may be needed to help your dentist detect any new cavities, determine the status of your gum health or evaluate the growth and development of your teeth. If a previous dentist has any radiographs of you, your new dentist may ask you for copies of them.

 

Exposure to all sources of radiation -- including the sun, minerals in the soil, appliances in your home, and dental X-rays -- can damage the body's tissues and cells and lead to the development of cancer. Fortunately, the dose of radiation you are exposed to during the taking of X-rays is extremely small.

 

Advances in dentistry over the years have led to the low radiation levels emitted by dental X-rays. Some of the improvements are new digital X-ray machines that limit the radiation beam to the small area being X-rayed.  In 2012, Zent Family Dentistry updated all of their x-rays to become digital.  Digital x-rays have up to 75% less radiation than traditional x-rays.

 

 

 

 

Fluoride is a mineral that helps fight tooth decay. It is found in public water supplies, toothpaste and many other dental products. 


Often called, “nature’s cavity fighter,” fluoride helps repair the early stages of tooth decay even before the decay can be seen. Research shows that fluoride helps prevent cavities in children and adults by making teeth more resistant to the acid attacks that cause cavities. When you brush your teeth with fluoride toothpaste, or use other fluoride dental products, you are preventing cavities and strengthening your teeth’s enamel. 

A dentist or hygienist can also apply fluoride to the teeth as a gel, foam, or varnish. These treatments contain a much higher level of fluoride than the amount found in toothpastes and mouth rinses. Zent Family Dentistry mostly uses fluoride varnish as the main form of fluoride treatment.  The varnishes are painted on the teeth in one or two minutes.  After a fluoride application, you can eat or drink almost anything.  We advise you not to drink anything hot in temperature right after the varnish application.  We also ask that you don’t brush the varnish off until nighttime.  

 

 

 

 

Sometimes people have trouble flossing or brushing their teeth for a variety of reasons.  Many times the hygienists at Zent Family Dentistry will provide you with different hygiene aids to see if they help you maintain and better your oral hygiene.  Some examples of hygiene aids that are given out as complimentary samples are listed below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brushing your teeth is an important part of your oral hygiene routine. For a healthy mouth and smile the ADA recommends you:

  • Brush your teeth twice a day with a soft-bristled brush. The size and shape of your brush should fit your mouth allowing you to reach all areas easily.

  • Replace your toothbrush every three or four months, or sooner if the bristles are frayed. A worn toothbrush won’t do a good job of cleaning your teeth.

  • Make sure to use an ADA-accepted fluoride toothpaste.

 

The proper brushing technique is to:

  • Place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the gums. 

  • Gently move the brush back and forth in short (tooth-wide) strokes. 

  • Brush the outer surfaces, the inner surfaces, and the chewing surfaces of the teeth.

  • To clean the inside surfaces of the front teeth, tilt the brush vertically and make several up-and-down strokes.

  • Brush your tongue to remove bacteria and keep your breath fresh.

 

Of course, brushing your teeth is only a part of a complete oral care routine. You should also make sure to:

  • Clean between teeth daily with floss or an interdental cleaner. Tooth decay-causing bacteria still linger between teeth where toothbrush bristles can’t reach. This helps remove plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line.

  • Eat a balanced diet and limit between-meal snacks.

  • Visit your dentist regularly for professional cleanings and oral exams

 

Flossing:

  • Flossing is an essential part of any oral health care routine. The American Dental Association recommends flossing at least once a day to achieve optimal oral health. By flossing daily, you help remove plaque from the areas between your teeth where the toothbrush can't reach. This is important because plaque that is not removed by brushing and flossing can eventually harden into calculus or tartar. Flossing also helps prevent gum disease and cavities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thorough brushing and flossing help remove food particles and plaque from smooth surfaces of teeth. But toothbrush bristles cannot reach all the way into the depressions and grooves to extract food and plaque. Sealants protect these vulnerable areas by "sealing out" plaque and food.

 

Sealants are a thin, plastic coating that is painted on the chewing surfaces of teeth -- usually the back teeth (the premolars, and molars) -- to prevent tooth decay. The painted on liquid sealant quickly bonds into the depressions and groves of the teeth, forming a protective shield over the enamel of each tooth.  No anesthetic or numbing is needed when sealants are placed.

 

Typically, children are candidates for sealants on their permanent molars and premolars as soon as these teeth come in depending on how deep the grooves are in these teeth.  In this way, the dental sealants can protect the teeth through the cavity-prone years of ages 6 to 14.

 

However, adults without decay or fillings in their molars can also benefit from sealants.

Sealants can protect the teeth from decay for many years, but they need to be checked for chipping or wear at regular dental check-ups.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Dental Exams

Dental Cleanings

Oral Cancer Screening

Digital X-Rays

Fluoride Treatment

Oral Hygiene Aids

Home Care

Sealants

 

Gingivitis is a gum disease that is an infection of the soft tissues that surround and support your teeth.  It can progress to periodontal disease (disease of the hard tissue or bone that holds in the teeth).  Periodontal disease is the #1 cause of tooth loss in adults. Because gum disease and periodontal disease is usually painless, you may not know you have it. Also referred to as gingivitis, gum disease is caused by plaque, the sticky film of bacteria that is constantly forming on our teeth.

 

Here are some warning signs that can signal a problem:

  • gums that bleed easily

  • red, swollen, tender gums

  • gums that have pulled away from the teeth

  • persistent bad breath or bad taste

  • permanent teeth that are loose or separating

  • any change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite

  • any change in the fit of partial dentures

 

Some factors increase the risk of developing gum and bone disease. They are:

  • poor oral hygiene

  • smoking or chewing tobacco

  • genetics

  • crooked teeth that are hard to keep clean 

  • pregnancy 

  • diabetes 

  • medications, including steroids, certain types of anti-epilepsy drugs, cancer therapy drugs, some calcium channel blockers and oral contraceptives

 

See your dentist if you suspect you have gum disease or periodontal disease because the sooner you treat it the better. The early stage of gum disease is called gingivitis. If you have gingivitis, your gums may become red, swollen and bleed easily. At this stage, the disease is still reversible and can usually be eliminated by a professional cleaning at your dental office, followed by daily brushing and flossing.

Advanced gum disease is called periodontitis. Chronic periodontitis can lead to the loss of tissue and bone that support the teeth and it may become more severe over time. If it does, your teeth will feel loose and start moving around in your mouth. This is the most common form of periodontitis in adults but can occur at any age. It usually gets worse slowly, but there can be periods of rapid progression.

Aggressive periodontitis is a highly destructive form of periodontal disease that occurs in patients who are otherwise healthy. Common features include rapid loss of tissue and bone and may occur in some areas of the mouth, or in the entire mouth.

 

Treatment

If you have a stubborn case of gum disease, your dentist may recommend a dental procedure called dental scaling.  This will remove plaque and tartar from your teeth and help your gums regain health. The scaling process is usually done in conjunction with a procedure known as root planing.

 

During the teeth scaling process, your dentist or dental hygienist will numb the gums and tooth roots with a local anesthesia, but teeth scaling and root planing cause very little discomfort. Your dentist or dental hygienist will use specialized tools to remove the hardened deposits of plaque buildup (tartar) from the teeth both above and below the gum line. Root planing involves smoothing rough spots on the roots of the teeth that can promote gum disease by trapping and holding bacteria.

 

The whole procedure may be done in a single visit, although generally a quadrant (1/4th of the mouth) or half of the mouth is recommended per appointment. After a scaling and planing, you can expect that your gums will be numb from the anesthesia and then possibly a little tender. But if you maintain a consistent oral health routine of twice-daily tooth brushing and daily flossing, your gums should quickly regain a firm, healthy, pink appearance.

 

Be sure that your dentist or dental hygienist knows your total health history before he or she performs a scaling and root planing procedure. The procedure can introduce bacteria into the bloodstream, so precautions may need to be taken to treat gum disease in people who are at increased risk for infections, such as those with heart problems, liver disease or a compromised immune system due to an illness, such as HIV.

 

 

 

 

Your mouth is the gateway to your body; therefore, it makes sense that any disease in your mouth will affect the rest of your body. Research between systemic diseases and periodontal diseases is ongoing. Many studies indicate that severe gum disease may be associated with several other health conditions such as heart disease or diabetes.

 

It is possible to have gum disease and have no warning signs. That is one reason why regular dental checkups and periodontal examinations are very important. Treatment methods depend upon the type of disease and how far the condition has progressed. Good dental care at home is essential to help keep periodontal disease from becoming more serious or recurring. Remember: You don’t have to lose teeth to gum disease. Brush your teeth twice a day, clean between your teeth daily, eat a balanced diet, and schedule regular dental visits for a lifetime of healthy smiles.

 
 

What Is Gingivitis?

Mouth-Body Connection

 

Porcelain Veneers

Veneers are thin, custom-made shells crafted of tooth-colored materials designed to cover the front side of teeth. They are an option for correcting stained, chipped, decayed or crooked teeth. Veneers are made by a dental technician, usually in a dental lab, working from a model provided by your dentist. Placing veneers is usually an irreversible process, because it's necessary to remove a small amount of enamel from your tooth to accommodate the shell. Your dentist may recommend that you avoid some foods and beverages that may stain or discolor your veneers such as coffee, tea or red wine. Sometimes a veneer might chip or fracture. But for many people the results are more than worth it.

 

The Hows and Whys of Porcelain Veneers

Porcelain laminate veneers consist of a compilation of several thin ceramic layers which replace original tooth enamel, and an adhesive layer. To apply a veneer, a very small amount of the original tooth enamel must be removed, usually less than a millimeter. This is essential as it creates room for the porcelain veneer to fit within the mouth and most accurately restore natural tooth function while creating an even better appearance than the original tooth.

 

The bond between original tooth and porcelain veneer is critical as it not only provides the esthetic perfection desired, but also a strong bond which is essential for correct veneer function. Light-sensitive resin is placed between the original tooth and the veneer and then hardened using a special curing light.

 

Porcelain laminate veneers consist of a compilation of several thin ceramic layers which replace original tooth enamel, and an adhesive layer. To apply a veneer, a very small amount of the original tooth enamel must be removed, usually less than a millimeter. This is essential as it creates room for the porcelain veneer to fit within the mouth and most accurately restore natural tooth function while creating an even better appearance than the original tooth.

 

The bond between original tooth and porcelain veneer is critical as it not only provides the esthetic perfection desired, but also a strong bond which is essential for correct veneer function. Light-sensitive resin is placed between the original tooth and the veneer and then hardened using a special curing light.

 

Porcelain veneers are a very successful option in many situations where the original tooth has developed poor color, shape, and contours. It is also a good choice for fractured teeth, gaps between teeth, and in some situations where the tooth position is compromised and there are minor bite-related problems. For some people, superficial stains do not respond well to tooth whitening or bleaching. In these situations, a porcelain veneer may be the best option.

 

The Benefits of Veneers

Since veneers are individually sculpted for each patient, it is nearly impossible to tell the difference between a veneer and a natural tooth. Unlike natural teeth, custom-made veneers resist coffee and tea stains, and cigarette smoke because they are made of high-tech materials.

 

With veneers—as opposed to crowns—your natural teeth remain largely intact with only a minimal amount being altered to fit the veneer.

 

For teeth that resist whitening, veneers can make even the darkest teeth appear bright white.  Dentists may also recommend veneers to quickly fix minor twists, overlaps, and small gaps.

 

Potential Veneer Downsides

Because a portion of the original tooth enamel is reduced, a veneer is not considered a reversible treatment. Although adjustments and even new veneers can be made, you can never reliably return to the original condition of the tooth.

 

Creating porcelain veneers requires some laboratory time, so expect at least a week before they’re ready to be applied.

 

After the porcelain veneers are attached you will probably have some sensitivity to hot and cold temperatures due to the removal of that thin layer of enamel. This typically disappears within a few days. In a healthy mouth properly treated with porcelain veneers—and where destructive forces are minimized or eliminated—a patient should be able to use porcelain veneers like his or her own teeth. Although they’re very strong, veneers are also brittle. You should avoid the same excessive stresses you would avoid with non-veneered teeth: don’t bite your fingernails, chew ice, or open beer bottles with your veneers!

 

If you have a habit of grinding or clenching your teeth, your dentist may fit you with a nighttime bite guard so you do not damage your veneers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Everybody loves a bright white smile, and there are a variety of products and procedures available to help you improve the look of yours. Many people are satisfied with the sparkle they get from daily oral hygiene and regular cleanings at your dentist’s office, but if you decide you would like to go beyond this to make your smile look brighter, you should investigate all of your whitening options.

 

Start by speaking with your dentist. He or she can tell you whether whitening procedures would be effective for you. Whiteners may not correct all types of discoloration. For example, yellow-ish hued teeth will probably bleach well, brownish-colored teeth may bleach less well, and grayish-hued teeth may not bleach well at all. If you have had bonding or tooth-colored fillings placed in your front teeth the whitener will not affect the color of these materials, and they will stand out in your newly whitened smile. You may want to investigate other options, like porcelain veneers or dental bonding.

 

If you are a candidate for teeth whitening, Zent Family Dentistry makes custom whitening trays to fit your mouth.  These trays can be used in the comfort of your own home and last for years.  We have multiple strengths of whitening gel to serve patients with differing levels of staining and also to help those with sensitive teeth.  Zent Family Dentistry recommends all patients undergoing teeth whitening to use a desensitizing toothpaste.

 

 

 

 

 

Composite resins, or tooth-colored fillings, provide good durability and resistance to fracture in small to mid-size fillings that need to withstand moderate pressure from the constant stress of chewing. They can be used on either front or back teeth. They are a good choice for people who prefer that their fillings look more natural.  Composites cost more than amalgam and occasionally are not covered by some insurance plans.

 

Sometimes composite filling material is used to change the shape and/or color of the front teeth.  This is called resin bonding or cosmetic bonding.

 

Cosmetic bonding is a process where the dentist attaches or “bonds” materials directly to your tooth in order to change the color and shape.  Many people receive cosmetic bonding to close gaps between their teeth.  The natural tooth enamel is then fused together with bonding materials such as porcelain and resins to create a strong structure that still feels like your original tooth. 

While it can be used for different purposes, according to the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, tooth bonding is most useful for repairing chipped teeth. That’s because the bonding materials and porcelain used are natural in color, and allows for a finished product that closely matches your surrounding teeth.

 

 

 

 

 

A crown is a cap that covers the whole tooth.  Most of the crowns completed at Zent Family Dentistry are made of porcelain or a combination of porcelain and zirconia. 

 

Full porcelain crowns look more natural and esthetic because they can mimic the translucent look of a natural tooth. Sometimes when more strength is needed due to a person clenching or grinding, or having a bite that is not idea, zirconia is used as a base for the crown or for the entire crown.  Zirconia is a tooth colored material that is stronger than porcelain but not quite as esthetic.

 

A crown can help strengthen a tooth with a large filling when there isn’t enough tooth structure remaining to hold the filling. Crowns can also be used to attach bridges, protect a weak tooth from breaking or restore one that’s already broken. A crown is a good way to cover teeth that are discolored or badly shaped. It’s also used to cover a dental implant.

 

 

 

 

 

Missing a tooth or teeth can be a daily embarrassment. It can also cause difficult in chewing or speaking. Bridges can help restore your smile.

 

Sometimes called a fixed partial denture, a bridge replaces missing teeth with artificial teeth and literally “bridges” the gap where one or more teeth used to be. This is done by preparing the teeth immediately behind and in front of the open space for crowns. Then the lab creates the bridge which is a single prosthesis consisting of an anchor tooth on each side of the open space and a “dummy” tooth or teeth in between to span the gap.  Unlike a partial or denture, which you can take out and clean, a bridge is cemented in place.

 

For areas in the front of the mouth, Zent Family Dentistry offers porcelain fixed bridges.  The dentist works with the lab to make a bridge that is not made from gold or metal and is instead made from porcelain or a combination of porcelain and zirconia. 

 

 

 

 

 

If you are self-conscious because you have missing teeth, wear dentures that are uncomfortable or don't want to have good tooth structure removed to make a bridge, talk to your dentist to see if dental implants are an option for you.

 

Dental implants are a popular and effective way to replace missing teeth and are designed to blend in with your other teeth. They are an excellent long-term option for restoring your smile. In fact, the development and use of implants is one of the biggest advances in dentistry in the past 40 years. Dental implants are made up of titanium and other materials that are compatible with the human body. They are posts that are surgically placed in the upper or lower jaw, where they function as a sturdy anchor for replacement teeth.

Most patients find that a dental implant is secure, stable and a good replacement for their own tooth.

 

There are generally three phases to getting an implant:

First, the dentist surgically places the implant into the jawbone. Your dentist may recommend a diet of soft foods, cold foods and warm soup during the healing process.

 

Next, the bone around the implant heals in a process called osseointegration. What makes an implant so strong is that the bone actually grows around it and holds it in place. Osseointegration means “combines with the bone” and takes time. Some patients might need to wait until the implant is completely integrated, up to several months, before replacement teeth can be attached to the implant. Other patients can have the implants and replacement teeth placed all in one visit.

 

Finally, it’s time for the placement of the artificial tooth/teeth. For a single tooth implant, your dentist will customize a new tooth for you, called a dental crown. The crown will be based on size, shape, color and fit, and will be designed to blend in with your other teeth.

 

If you are replacing more than a single tooth, custom-made bridges or dentures will be made to fit your mouth and your implants. (Note: The replacement teeth usually take some time to make. In the meantime, your dentist may give you a temporary crown, bridge or denture to help you eat and speak normally until the permanent replacement is ready.)

 

If you are interested in dental implants, it's a good idea to discuss it carefully with your dentist first. If you are in good general health this treatment may be an option for you. In fact, your health is more of a factor than your age. You may be medically evaluated by a physician before any implant surgery is scheduled. Chronic illnesses, such as diabetes or leukemia, may interfere with healing after surgery. Patients with these issues may not be good candidates for implants. Using tobacco can also slow healing.

 

 

 

 

 

Invisalign® takes a modern approach to straightening teeth, using a custom-made series of clear aligners created for you and only you. These aligner trays are made of smooth, comfortable and virtually invisible plastic that you wear over your teeth. Wearing the aligners will gradually and gently shift your teeth into place, based on the exact movements your dentist or orthodontist plans out for you. There are no metal brackets to attach and no wires to tighten. You just pop in a new set of aligners approximately every two weeks, until your treatment is complete. You’ll achieve a great smile with little interference in your daily life. The best part about the whole process is that most people won't even know you're straightening your teeth.

 

 

 

 

Invisalign® effectively corrects a wide variety of dental problems. Whether your teeth are widely gapped, overly crowded or somewhere in between, Invisalign has an affordable teeth straightening option for you.  Zent Family Dentistry offers free consults to discuss length of treatment and payment options. For more information, click here

 

 

 

 

Studies show that without retainers straight teeth can gradually shift back towards their initial position. This is a common occurrence with all orthodontic treatment, but is one that can easily be overcome. Wearing Vivera retainers after traditional braces or Invisalign treatment means you are keeping your teeth in their new position and protecting your smile and investment.  At Zent Family Dentistry, the fee for Invisalign includes 4 sets of clear plastic Vivera retainers.  Vivera retainers are made from the same clear, plastic state-of-the-art technology as the Invisalign aligners and will maintain your teeth in the desired position to help you preserve your new smile.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Teeth Whitening

Composite Filling/Bonding

Porcelain Crowns

Porcelain Fixed Bridges

Dental Implants

What Is Invisalign?

Am I A Candidate For Invisalign?

Care Following Orthodontics - Retainers